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20121201
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india and china to develop into a completely distinct world civilizations without having much to do with each other for long-term history. let's take that image that you offered of america, this amazingly simple geographic place with all of these natural harbors and rivers that run the right way but that was true for thousands of years and didn't leave to the development to rate civilization and european civilization and began to make powerful use of those the geographical advantages are obvious, so help us think about why it's geography that we should focus on as opposed to the cultural or civilization will aspect. >> that was due to the development of the failing chips which enable the croswell landed voyages, so that development of technology while it is short in distance it did not negate, it made it more important because it opened up a whole new geography and the world trade system cultural and economics flow from the geography because what is culture? it is the accumulated experience of a specific people on may specifically and skate over hundreds of thousands of years that l
'm with the world journal. could you address growing chinese assertiveness in south china sea and east china sea? and given china just announced they will intercept the ship's that go into territorial waters. so are you going to participate in upcoming defense talks with chinese? and what message do you want to tell them? thank you. >> well, thank you for that question. of course the issues that are being placed today in a south china sea and other areas in the north and central, east asia, i think are quite complicated because of the nature of the territorial disputes, some of them historic, some of them now driven by the need for access to resources in those areas, and that's i think to some degree has motivated some of the activities that you see, seeing there. the u.s. position as you know is that we don't take sides on territorial disputes. there's many of those around the globe, not just in the south china sea. but we do want them resolve peacefully, without coercion. and that we call on all the parties there, including the chinese, to ensure that as they approach these problems that they
and a half percent per year, suddenly it started going up 3% a year as china and india really kicked in. other things being equal, if you change the rate of emission of co2 to the atmosphere, the so-called airborne fraction, the fraction of the co2 that appears in the atmosphere should increase, simply because that quick injection of co2 causes the ocean surface layers to be relatively saturated so it can't get in to the ocean as fast as it used to. but what's actually happened in the last 12 years is the airborne fraction has plummeted. it's now only about 40%. the other 60% is disappearing. and it's not mostly going in to the ocean. the good fraction of it is being taken up, somehow, by the terrestrial biosphere. and i think that's because of the -- we were doubling -- i think we're doubling down on the faustian bargain because we're fertilizing the terrestrial biosphere, both with the co2 in the atmosphere and the combination of that with more nitrogen which will spread in part of -- the nitrogen is being spread around by these aerosols which china and india are putting out and its a
that that causes, particularly in an era where rising demand for petroleum in china and india and elsewhere is creating potential conflict for these resources, then you have to recognize that transportation has to be diversified away from petroleum where the prices are set on the world market. canada and norway have been net petroleum exporters, but they pay in those countries the same market price for a gallon of gasoline as we do. so you must diversify, and that includes electrification of short-haul transportation, light-duty trucks and vehicles, and the adoption of natural gas either in its lick if i quide or compressed forms for heavy-duty vehicles and over the road vehicles. but taken as a whole if the recommendations of the eslc are adopted, the united states has the potential to reduce our dependence on imported petroleum and thereby reduce our national security risk to improve our balance of payments and about half of our balance of payments deficit remains petroleum, and to increase our g.d.p. by the maximization of these activities in the united states rather than exporting our d
also have an economic competitor and a partner in china. they have a voracious appetite for natural resources and we're looking at new ways to get these in our own backyard, and maybe i will ask you this question, admiral. how important is the china factor in america energy program's going forward? >> i will talk to doubt, but i would like to mention a few puffs things about this report that may not have come out in your opening remarks. we definitely advocating opening of drilling in the united states where we cannot, but there is a very strong part of this report that says it has to be done safely and we know how to do it safely. that is one contribution of those of us who have served in the armed forces, we do a lot of dangerous stuff in the armed forces, fuel, nuclear power, explosives. the way we do that safely is a high standards, rigid enforcement, and very professional inspectors to do it. we strongly recommend applying this model to regulatory body so that we can do this safely, so that we can do oil retractions safely. that we can do safely. the general and i live in penns
but also offer a great opportunity. you see, what i find in africa today is that china has an increasing presence on that continent. china has a plan when it comes to the future of africa. america does not. that's why i'm going to offer as an amendment to the tag bill, which is currently pending before the senate, the american jobs through greater exports to africa act. my partners on the bill are senator chris coons, senator ben cardin, john boozman and mary landrieu, as well as support in the house from representative chris smith. at the heart of this bill is the creation of jobs in america. exporting more goods to africa will help create jobs here. every $1 billion in exports supports over 5,000 jobs. i believe we can increase exports from the united states to africa by 200% in real dollars over the next ten years, and we can't wait any longer. if there are some who say africa is so backward and so far behind, what is it in the united states they can afford to buy if they even wanted to, that is old thinking. let me give you some new reality. in the past ten years six of the world's f
deal, it will be one of the largest ever by chinese investors. china's state owned oil giant c-nook swooped in to acquire nexen for a cool $15 billion. note to the obama administration, it is not happening in a bubble. last year you'll recall the obama administration put off a decision on the excel pipeline, an extension of a pipeline that would connect the oil in alberta to the gulf of mexico and international markets. the democrats killed it because of concerns from environmentalists. the proposed route crossed the aquifer in nebraska and white house and state department officials could have just insisted on rerouting the pipe, but they didn't. a bad move, one that was highly thought to play to the president's base. now that the elections are over, a review of a new route will begin sometime next year. the leakages of that pipe were a minor concern, though it got all the headlines. a more legitimate environmental concern is carbon emissions. processing crude that is mined from the oil sands emits double the emissions of regular drilled oil. but oil sands still -- that still s
from the ship to power in the united states and the west, to china and east. the powers of globalization in the digital era, how to do with the 1.6 billion muslims in the world, threats of iranian nuclear power. and i also look at internal threats. low birthrates, a simulation and again whether we can in effect succeed at a time when we are more successful than ever being integrated in our society. it's a new phenomenon and that's really what i wanted to write the book. i also write about that from an israeli is. i've been to israel maybe 40 times. three times this year alone during the carter and clinton administrations is deeply involved in policies between the u.s. and israel, but i'll say right from the perspective of someone who has relatives in israel, who has spent many, many years in time in israel. so it's a unique give looking from the outside in and the inside out. >> israel was one of the few foreign policy issues in the 2012 campaign. mitt romney saying you won't see many some night. is the u.s. relationship and vice versa a healthy relationship? >> it's a r
if a bomb caused it or an exploding gas cylinder. many run on natural gas. china, a blizzard slamming inner mongol -- mongolia. the storm started yesterday and dumping three feet of snow by this morning. the temperatures are expected to plummet over the next two days. japan, the newly installed prime minister is taking a tour of the fukushima nuclear plant. a massive earthquake devastated the place in 2011. they are considering plans to phase-out the atomic energy altogether over the next several decades. spain, a flower in the face. it is the annual flower fight using eggs and firecrackers and flour. and it is a day marking the innocence, spain's equivalence of april fool's. it is this fox trip around the world in 80 seconds. >>> a french constitutional panel is saying goodbye to that country's staggering 75% tax rate on the wealthy. the panel has ruled the tax is unconstitutional and unfair. let me say it again. 75% on the wealthy. it was set to kick in at the start of 2013 and will hit anyone hitting a million euros. critics didn't like it. they said it would drive away france's wealthy
it or an exploding gas cylinder. many run on natural gas. china, a blizzard slamming inner mongol -- mongolia. the storm started yesterday and dumping three feet of snow by this morning. the temperatures are expected to plummet over the next two days. japan, the newly installed prime minister is taking a tour of the fukushima nuclear plant. a massive earthquake devastated the place in 2011. they are considering plans to phase-out the atomic energy altogether over the next several decades. spain, a flower in the face. it is the annual flower fight using eggs and firecrackers and flour. and it is a day marking the innocence, spain's equivalence of april fool's. it is this fox trip around the world in 80 seconds. >>> a french constitutional panel is saying goodbye to that country's staggering 75% tax rate on the wealthy. the panel has ruled the tax is unconstitutional and unfair. let me say it again. 75% on the wealthy. it was set to kick in at the start of 2013 and will hit anyone hitting a million euros. critics didn't like it. they said it would drive away france's wealthy population. joining
and latin america. the company has big expansion plans in china. there are currently more than 18,000 starbuck's around the globe. they're now charging $7 for the snazzy cup of coffee. so, of course, they can expand. >> some kind of premium blend, exotic blend. >> flecks of gold in it. >> should for $7 a cup. your thursday forecast, everybody. we have showers from portland to seattle. up to 8 inches of snow in the cascades and northern rockies. still mild in the nation's midsection. pop-up showers around omaha, nebraska and louisville. scattered showers from the carolina coast through florida. >> 70s from dallas to miami. mostly 40s in the northwest. 77 in phoenix. 37 in billings. >>> 'tis the season for some really funny movies, funny flicks. we want your help to pick the best, "world news now" classic christmas competition. say that five times fast. >> that is a mouthful. >> so get this, logon to our website at wnnfans.com. and vote. we both look borderline. >> i look cross-eyed. you look constipated. >> too many candy canes. vote early and often. on our facebook page. let us kn
was union and we were making $16 an hour. it went overseas. the company would prefer to go to china and a somebody $2 a day or whatever. these right-to-work states are full of temporary jobs agencies with contracts. the stamp services -- these temporary services are making money and paying people a fraction. we need to let politicians go to a temporary service and give them half of what they are making and make them see how we feel. people working for small amounts of money at temp services. ynette.ow to panetta, conwalive caller: they call it a right-to- work states, but i guess the language got changed, because it used to be a free will state. the employers without unions had the right to fire you for anything, any reason or no reason at all, and you had no recourse. so i still believe in unions and i still believe the people should have a right to join or not. host: this tweet -- are you with us? caller: i am. host: higher wages of less jobs in the state's. caller: yes, but most of the jobs in this area, in the myrtle beach area, those are minimum- wage jobs, where i live. if we
he came from, back to china, but his home country, our good old buddies, the chinese, refused to take him back. they didn't want him, and so they stalled and stalled and stalled, and over those three years of chinese stalling and gave him the run-around, chen was eventually free and free to kill and kill he did. mr. speaker, this tragedy is not an isolated phenomena. flafflet, other americans have died as a result -- unfortunately, other americans have died as a result of a gaping hole in the immigration system. it's no secret that everybody believes our immigration system is broken. fixing it down the road will be complex and complicated, but there's some things we can do about immigration right now to fix specific problems and here's one of these. currently, mr. speaker, thousands of criminal aliens are in our country, just like chen, that have committed a crime, gone to prison, our immigration worked to order them deported but their country won't take them back. they refuse to do so, so those countries stall and delay and eventually never take back their outlaws. so by law when the
where we can solve the whole immigration problem. people say, how do we compete with china? we can have the entire world at our disposal and start businesses. then we have to focus on tax and the corporate tax reform to get a system that is simpler and makes it easier for businesses to compete in the world. that will be enormous. there is an infrastructure investment that needs to be made. this is important with the budget deal going forward. we have to think about what our values are. we can spend money on infrastructure to make investments in the future rather than having short-term spending. support for basic research and for higher education, as drew talked about. tell us what is and we can plan around it with respect to health care costs and energy costs. then it businesses can create a renaissance of american competitiveness. >> i think that is a brilliant agenda. i don't think that has changed. let's assume we go through the fiscal cliff. immigration, investments. you are not going to do a dream act. we had a chance to do it. george bush, john mccain. maybe the republicans learne
, french, german, russia, china, so once all tend to view it as a proliferation problem. it tends to be about that issue very narrowly focused. so to kind of move the conversation, you have to figure a different architecture to address that. but the five plus one processors such as designed to do with the proliferation issue in the conversation is that it has to do with arantxa violations of the npt that a security council resolution suggests iran activity so forth and so on. there's two countries however that suggests the issue that this is not a proliferation issue that has to do with the character for the regime but those are for israel. the second one is iran who similarly suggested that this is nice control issue from the perspective of the west, but there really is an arms control is a multilateral icing regime. there were two that is in this particular who are not accepting the argument. the argument about nuclear infractions. so having said that, if you look at it historically, the united states has managed to negotiate successfully arms control treaties with countries of
on january 4th. they fear this could be to natural gas production what the "china syndrome" was to the nuclear power industry. it stars matt damon looking to line up leases in pennsylvania farm country and john as a environmental activist to try to stop him. >> i'm here my farm is gone. the land turned brown. it happened to one of us. it could happen to all of us. >> reporter: damon and chris since ski who co-wrote the script together, they're using fracking as jumping off point to explore american identity. >> it really asks more questions than it answers but they're important questions that i think we're all need to be asking right now. >> reporter: but conservative blogs like the heritage foundation say this move -- movie looks nothing on surface to be hit piece on tracking indisstri. analysts say this could be a big problem going forward. charles edwards with the brookings institution. >> someone like matt damon will make convincing actor, undoubtedly casting concerns about shale gas on the horizon. that will probably become a lot of people's perceptions that shale gas
three behind canada and china, about $460 billion a year. so lot of levers we can use here. of that $460 billion, a huge amount is tourism. is it really worth them sort of gaining this venal corrupt image with this violence. do they want o pay the millions and millions, possibly hundreds of millions in lost tourism just so they can do whatever it is that the corrupt local government is doing to this? >> steve: one of the things is this guy is being charged with is he brought into the country of mexico a gun used by the military, ammunition used by the military as well. you know what? that is flat out not true. this is a case that is so easy to dismiss and yet, we're five days away from christmas and that guy is sitting down there. >> brian: it takes some high ranking person in the state department to pick up the phone and say, get him out of there. >> steve: how about the president? they've got cable in the white house. they're watching fox news channel. that would be great for that family if he -- >> brian: even they get satellite dish. even if it's direct tv, they probably still get us
to evacuate u.s. military personnel. >>> now to a terrifying scene for shoppers in china. if you are afraid of sharks, you may not want to watch this video. this was an indoor tsunami. a huge shark tank burst, sending broken glass and water crashing into onlookers. more than a dozen people were injured. mostly with minor cuts and bruises. sadly, the sharks did not survive. >> who thought that was a good idea? >>> the economy could suffer a major blow next week if thousands of union dock workers make good on their threat to strike. a walkout would close every port from boston to houston. that means tons of goods would not be able to move in or out. the contract expired back in september. >>> and it is that time of year again when warnings go out to everyone about the dangers of thin ice. case in point, take a look at this from monroe county, michigan. jim swayze was walking his dogs when one of them went out on the ice and fell in. oh, poor guy. his wife called in her cousin, he came out, jumped in the water to help their dog. rescue crews were able to get man and best friend to safety. good
the russian point of view was that gorbachev also wanted to improve relations with china and japan. and with 100 inf missiles directed at him, how was he going to do that? it's really not in their interest to have 100 missiles out of europe. and it was really in their interest. now, we now have access, have for some years, records of the polit bureau discussions. and let me go back to a couple words about president reagan. before he first met gorbachev, he wrote out on a yellow pad several pages, without any prompting from anybody, what he wanted to achieve in geneva in his first meeting. this was handed literally to me as we are getting off the plane in geneva, saying this is what the president has on his mind. if he is wrong somewhere, we will have to straighten him out. actually, it was a very, very precise paper. and among other things, he pointed out that our biggest problems, one of these was a lack of trust. that he had to find a way to begin to create trust. we're not going to solve anything else. he also had it, if i don't achieve anything else, i must convince gorbachev t
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)